The Problems with (Cultural) Marxism, Capitalism, Social Justice, Critical Race….

Richard The Chwalek
10 min readOct 19, 2022

Each theory is unrealistic, inaccurate, and-or misunderstood, to an extent.

Photo by Artturi Jalli on Unsplash.

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No single socio-economic theory, system or strategy can tackle the whole spectrum of issues America has, or is still creating. Nothing is perfect. Most constructs developed — that achieve a decent level of public awareness — become partially, or mostly, outdated in as little as a decade or two. Even true believers often revise or reinterpret their gospels. Any theory that is honestly trying to tackle a socio-economic problem should never be discarded out of hand. Marxist theory is older than Critical Race Theory, but each one should be looked at with a skeptical eye. The details do matter, revised or not. The approach to implementing the new theory is as more important as the reasoning, or logic in the original documentation. Being critical and skeptical have their place, yet these practices are not wholly sufficient, and too often a political ploy to subvert transformation.

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The status quo is apt to thwart the introduction and implementation of every new socio-economic idea in a reactionary, often violent, manner. The Brits pushed back on our attempt in the 1770s. Slave owners pushed back in the 1860s. Red-baiters, southern city and state governments, and White supremacists pushed back during the 1950s and 60s. In the 1970s and beyond, White northerners pushed back by fleeing to the suburbs. Fear of change, even when great good can come from it decades later, will elicit terrible reactionary societal tremors. The dominate culture denies many socio-economic problems until disruption becomes eruption. The status quo warns that the change is happening too fast, when it is their decades of willful ignorance, and dogged denial that has created the powder keg.

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Consider the abolition of racialized, chattel slavery. Scientific racism, beginning in the 1500s, was used to justify New World slavery, and religion was purposefully infused by slave owners in the 1830s to justify the peculiar institution to another erroneous level. Even today, many Americans justify historical slavery because that’s just how things were done back then, or say it was extremely difficult, maybe impossible to…

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Richard The Chwalek

Mostly serious stuff w/ bits of sarcastic fluff. I wish more could be told yet bios have room 4 short & bold. You’ll see less length isn’t my greatest strength.